Happy Friday everyone!

The other day I was working with a new customer getting NetFlow export enabled on his Cisco 3800 routers. When I was explaining the concept of using the ip flow ingress command in enabling NetFlow per interface, he said:

“I have to do that on all my interfaces?!? I have like ten sub-interfaces to do.”

In reality, ten interfaces isn’t really hard to configure, but it can be… cumbersome.

So if you are enabling NetFlow on a device with LOTS of vlans, a nice quick way to get things up and running is to use the int range command.

You can do this by typing the following:

#: int range

For example, yesterday he was trying to enable ip flow ingress on a range of subinterfaces. So we used the following:

#: int range eth0/1.160 – eth0/1.300

Once you specify your interface range, you’ll get the following prompt:

#int range eth0/1.160-eth0/1.300>

From there, just enter the command you want to apply across all interfaces. In our case: ip flow ingress

There. You just saved about one minute of your life that you can devote to something else.

 

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Ryan Slosser

My name is Ryan. I work in development here at Plixer. I mostly deal with hardware deployment. I enjoy kayaking and fishing during the summer and skiing in the winter. People can count on me and I always give 100% unless I'm donating blood.

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